Winter 2020
For those who have a vision
Your home is more than a building or an address. It’s where you experience life, family, connection, growth. Your home should be as exceptional as you are, and as you are going to be. For a lifestyle inspired by your potential, there is only LIV Sotheby’s International Realty.
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22955 Peak to Peak Highway, Nederland. $4,450,000.
124 Victoria Drive, Telluride. $3,850,000.
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Snowshoe Staff Lifetime
table of contents | issue 26: winter 2020
INDULGE & IMBIBE
Sit at the Bar!
Gabby Gourmet, our beloved foodie, visits two Denver restaurants where the bar scene is an experience not to miss.
Made in Colorado
What better way to commemorate your Colorado experience than with a gift or memento that is Colorado-made? Shauna Farnell has some suggestions guaranteed to surprise and delight.
CHECKING IN
Settle in and Stay
Eric Elkins did your homework and offers up a great assortment of hotels around Colorado that will cater to your every need (or whim!).
This Haus Rules
Breckenridge’s newest hotel offers location, ambience and everything in between. Eric Elkins illustrates why Gravity Haus Breckenridge is such a special new addition to the mountain lodging experience.
Explore
Down in the Denver Tech Center
The DTC is a fun destination, and Monica Parpal Stockbridge highlights some of the area’s restaurants, shops, hotels and nightlife that are drawing people from near and far.
Steamboat Springs: A Winter Wonderland
The charming mountain town of Steamboat Springs is rich in history and flavor. Today, it’s a lively blend of rustic and new, and Rebecca Treon shows why the town and the ski resort are special hidden gems.
PERSONALITY
Meet Lindsey Vonn
She’s bold, beautiful, and still on the fast track since retiring from racing. Shauna Farnell takes you into Lindsey Vonn’s world in an exclusive one-on-one interview.
Go Broncos! Go Defense!
Rain or shine, win or lose, we love our Denver Broncos. Check out our interview with defensive lineman Shelby Harris, who excels on and off the field.
ADVENTURE
Welcome to Ski(n) Season
Skinning is gaining popularity as a way to power up the hill, savor the view, and get a fantastic workout. Learn the ins and outs of this popular new sport as Micah Ling takes you on a turn-by-turn look at what to expect.
in every issue
Publisher’s Note
CURRENT
Real Estate Update
Local Celebs Dish on Their Favorite Winter Warmers
Ski Resort Fun Facts
 Mountain Thrills and Town Charm Text
Frisco Adventure Park
Horses with carriage and people in snow
Fireworks in a Snowy Town
Frisco Colorado Logo
Surrounded by 6 world-class ski resorts. Take your pick!
90 minutes from Denver.
TownofFrisco.com
Frisco Colorado Mountain Logo
VAIL
COPPER MTN
BRECKENRIDGE
KEYSTONE
A-BASIN
LOVELAND
publisher’s NOTE | issue 26: winter 2020
Ellen Gray headshot
W

elcome to the new issue of Colorado Traveler. We are excited to share that we’ve gone 100-percent digital. So many of our loyal readers have told us they’d love to receive Colorado Traveler in their inbox, so we listened, and we delivered.

As you’ll see, Colorado Traveler remains true to its commitment to deliver compelling content that showcases our beautiful state in all its facets – rave-worthy restaurants, don’t-miss attractions, sophisticated hotels and resorts and more – all from the perspective of our writers who live here and love every moment! We cover the personalities who call Colorado home, the adventures to be had, the scenery to behold.

In this issue, we’re excited to provide a close-up interview with superstar skier Lindsey Vonn, whose work ethic, tenacity and determination made her the one of the sports most-famous, and most-watched competitors. Now retired from the racing circuit, Vonn continues to push limits, devoting time to her nonprofit, writing a memoir and so much more.

We also take you around the state to some of our favorite resorts and hotels. With so many wonderful options and amenities, you’ll understand why Colorado is the place to visit – and to return to time and again. From the mountains to the city, there’s no end to unique experiences and adventures to discover every time you travel – whether you are from out of town or are fortunate to live here year-round.

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Website: coloradotravelermagazine.com
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EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
Ellen Gray

ART DIRECTOR
Anthony Toddy

CONTRIBUTORS
Eric Elkins
Shauna Farnell
Micah Ling
Pat “Gabby Gourmet” Miller
Monica Parpal Stockbridge
Rebecca Treon

SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR
Zoie Jordan

COLORADO TRAVELER MAGAZINE
1776 S. Jackson Street, Suite 208
Denver, CO 80210

ColoradoTravelerMagazine.com
 
Reproduction without permission from publisher is prohibited. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in the publication, the publisher cannot accept liability for errors and omissions.

Current
MOUNTAIN
HOME
AESTHETICS
Get a Modern Makeover
By Amanda Molitor
Pictured: 140 West Serapio Drive Telluride, CO.
Current
Pictured: 140 West Serapio Drive Telluride, CO.
MOUNTAIN
HOME
AESTHETICS
Get a Modern Makeover
By Amanda Molitor
T

here’s something about the mountains that captivates us as humans. Their size, the environment they create, the way their colors change throughout the day and throughout the seasons. Mountains have been muses for artists for centuries and continue to inspire the way many choose to decorate their homes.

Bringing the outside into interior design has long been practiced in the mountain regions but recently the typical regional style has seen a shift in approach. Traditionally, mountain motifs have been more literal translations of what it means to live in the Rockies. Interior designs often incorporated the exact hues, textures, and patterns found right outside the front door. Rich, warm-toned paint colors commonly coated the walls of great rooms and bright fabrics often overpowered furniture and window dressings. Similarly, the rustic aesthetic was taken to an extreme in many cases with the over-use of mounted trophy animals, antlers, and historically inspired art. However, today more mountain homes are taking a lighter, less-is-more approach to design.

Current
Baby It’s Cold Outside
By Eric Elkins
We all have it — the one thing that warms us when winter settles in on Colorado. We asked some of our favorite locals to share their go-to winter warmers.
The problem with winter sports is that
follow me closely here
they generally take place in winter.
— Dave Barry
Kendra Anderson headshot
Kendra Anderson, Owner of Bar Helix 
My ultimate winter warmer is a hot toddy … but not made with the traditional whisky. I prefer to use mezcal instead — that extra boost of smokiness is perfect for sipping on a chilly evening.
Adam Cayton-Holland headshot
Adam Cayton-Holland, Comic/Writer, and winner of the Colorado Book Award for Best Non-Fiction for “Tragedy + Time”
Pho 95. Filet special. On a cold day? Nothing better. Warms you right down to your soul. Federal Boulevard is a treasure-trove culinarily, and there’s plenty of great pho spots. Which is best is the subject of great debate. Pho 95 is my favorite. Hands down.
Current
Ski Fever
Resort Fun Facts
By Micah Ling
Where are Colorado’s longest runs?
Galloping Goose, 4.6 miles
The 4.6-mile Galloping Goose is the longest run at Telluride Ski Resort. It’s groomed daily and designated as beginner / intermediate.
Galloping Goose Snow
Longshot, 5.3 miles
The Longshot at Snowmass Mountain is one of the longest ski runs in the United States. At 5.3 miles, it offers plenty of intermediate turns down the mountain.
Longshot Snowmass Mountain
indulge + imbibe
Sit
at the Bar
Eat, Drink, See and Be Seen
By Gabby Gourmet
Today’s dining scene brings many choices, not only in food and service but also in ambience and vibe. Denver’s dining scene has grown up over the past few years, and we’re proud to feature some of the country’s most highly hyped offerings. Even though relaxing in the restaurant dining room is a treat, one of the best ways to savor today’s eating-out vibe is to grab a seat at the bar. So where to start? Here are two local options that have wonderful dining rooms and an awesome bar scene.
indulge + imbibe
Red C with 7 in the middle
must-try
Colorado-born
products
By Shauna Farnell
Red C with 7 in the middle
must-try
Colorado-born
products
By Shauna Farnell
Red C with 7 in the middle
must-try
Colorado-born
products
By Shauna Farnell
From snacks to sustainable shoes, there’s no shortage of great items that pay tribute to Colorado’s unique lifestyle.
When traveling, it’s always fun to bring back a little something that serves as a lasting memento of your trip. Whether it’s a gift for someone else or a treat for you, there is a bounty of innovative, useful and super-cool products from which to choose. Here are some of the centennial state’s most-winning homegrown libations, fashion statements and snacks that make for one-of-a-kind gifts.
Checking in
Settle in and Stay
Colorado’s hotel packages have it all
By Eric Elkins
Hotel Indigo
F

or as much fun as you can have wandering around downtown Denver or making the most of a mountain town, sometimes you just want to settle in and leave the outside world behind. And in many of Colorado’s plush hotels, you don’t have to brave the elements to find yourself a stellar meal or a mess of delicious cocktails, because everything you need is right there in the building with you.

Station Staycations
For a fun urban escape, take the light rail to Union Station and stay at the Kimpton Hotel Born. Between the classic rooms with a modern touch, a staff that’s dedicated to making sure you feel welcome and appreciated, and one of the best steak restaurants in the city, the hotel offers the perfect indulgence. Package your stay with a chef’s counter dinner at Citizen Rail, with its steak aging room right there in the restaurant, and buckle up for a pampered experience you won’t forget. Be sure to hit up Tavernetta next door for the best happy hour, including the perfect $6 negroni.
explore
Down in the
The Denver Tech Center is now a Mile High hangout
By Monica Parpal Stockbridge
M

y first “real” job was in the Denver Tech Center. I worked for a startup in one of three bland office buildings in the heart of the city’s technology hub. At the time, I was thrilled. Never mind the dearth of cool restaurants or bars. I was making my way in the working world! My father worked for a large corporation headquartered in the Tech Center, just on the other side of the highway. My uncle worked for an e-commerce giant a few buildings over. Today, my husband still commutes to his office in the DTC. 

This synthesis of startup ventures and colossal corporations seemed to define this pocket of Southeast Denver for years. Designed in the ‘70s, the Denver Tech Center has grown from 40 acres to more than 800 acres. Companies like Great-West Life, Arrow Electronics, Comcast and Zoom Video Communications now call the DTC home. And while for the longest time it seemed that all the trendy new restaurants and homegrown hangouts were in LoDo or RiNo, that mindset is changing. 

shutterstock.com
explore
shutterstock.com
Down in the
The Denver Tech Center is now a Mile High hangout
By Monica Parpal Stockbridge
M

y first “real” job was in the Denver Tech Center. I worked for a startup in one of three bland office buildings in the heart of the city’s technology hub. At the time, I was thrilled. Never mind the dearth of cool restaurants or bars. I was making my way in the working world! My father worked for a large corporation headquartered in the Tech Center, just on the other side of the highway. My uncle worked for an e-commerce giant a few buildings over. Today, my husband still commutes to his office in the DTC. 

This synthesis of startup ventures and colossal corporations seemed to define this pocket of Southeast Denver for years. Designed in the ‘70s, the Denver Tech Center has grown from 40 acres to more than 800 acres. Companies like Great-West Life, Arrow Electronics, Comcast and Zoom Video Communications now call the DTC home. And while for the longest time it seemed that all the trendy new restaurants and homegrown hangouts were in LoDo or RiNo, that mindset is changing. 

Checking in
This
Haus
Rules
The newest lodging in Breckenridge is more than a hotel
Checking in
This
Haus
Rules
The newest lodging in Breckenridge is more than a hotel
By Eric Elkins
It’s a direct reflection of how we eat, how we play, and how we live.”

For Gravity Haus founder and owner Jim Deters, merely opening a gorgeous hotel at the foot of Peak 9 in Breckenridge wasn’t going to be enough. “It’s not just a boutique hotel, it’s a full community asset,” he tells me.

We’re sitting at Unravel coffee shop in Denver, a stylish spot Deters just happens to own, and he’s showing me photos and plans on his phone, ridiculously excited about what his team is bringing to the funky cool ski town in Summit County, Colorado.

“It’s community-inspired first,” he says. “We call it a campus, not a hotel. Everything else out there now is either super fancy and expensive or corporate-y crap. We asked ourselves, where’s the authentic thing? How can you seamlessly move from work to play to activities — a sort of choose your own adventure, where Mom, Dad, and the kids can all do things and be happy?”

Explore
Winter Wonderland red text title
Discovering Steamboat Springs
By Rebecca Treon
red script Steamboat Springs is different from other mountain towns in ski country. Unlike Aspen, Breckenridge, Telluride, and most of Colorado’s other ski resort towns, Steamboat didn’t start its life as a mining town. The Ute tribe used it as its summer hunting grounds and for the area’s mineral hot springs for physical and spiritual therapy. In the 1800s, French trappers dubbed it Steamboat Springs after they mistakenly thought they heard the sound of a chugging steam engine, when in fact it was the sound being made by a bubbling natural spring.

The first homestead was built there in 1874 and by 1884, the area was an official townsite. By 1885 it had five more families, a newspaper called the Steamboat Pilot (which is still being published), and a sawmill. By 1900, there were hotels, banks, general stores, butchers, and a utility service company. When the railroad arrived in 1909, the ranchers of the valley turned Steamboat into one of the West’s largest cattle shipping centers. The railroad also brought tourists, who came for the hot springs, scenery, and by 1910, skiing. Fun fact: Steamboat has the most Olympians of any North American ski town: 96 and counting!

Explore
Winter Wonderland red text title
Discovering Steamboat Springs
By Rebecca Treon
red script Steamboat Springs is different from other mountain towns in ski country. Unlike Aspen, Breckenridge, Telluride, and most of Colorado’s other ski resort towns, Steamboat didn’t start its life as a mining town. The Ute tribe used it as its summer hunting grounds and for the area’s mineral hot springs for physical and spiritual therapy. In the 1800s, French trappers dubbed it Steamboat Springs after they mistakenly thought they heard the sound of a chugging steam engine, when in fact it was the sound being made by a bubbling natural spring.

The first homestead was built there in 1874 and by 1884, the area was an official townsite. By 1885 it had five more families, a newspaper called the Steamboat Pilot (which is still being published), and a sawmill. By 1900, there were hotels, banks, general stores, butchers, and a utility service company. When the railroad arrived in 1909, the ranchers of the valley turned Steamboat into one of the West’s largest cattle shipping centers. The railroad also brought tourists, who came for the hot springs, scenery, and by 1910, skiing. Fun fact: Steamboat has the most Olympians of any North American ski town: 96 and counting!

Personality
Lindsey Vonn red title text
finding new fast track(s) since retiring from racing
America’s No. 1 skier of all time is jetsetting, enterprising and engaged
By Shauna Farnell
L

indsey Vonn has kept herself plenty busy since retiring from ski racing. The 35-year-old has launched new clothing collections, a beauty line, written a memoir, starred in an HBO documentary, led children’s camps and has walked countless red carpets. Oh yes, she’s also engaged.

Having put her Vail home on the market and relocated to New Jersey with fiancé and NHL star P.K. Subban, Vonn is still coming to terms with the reality of ending her ski career. After all, this marks her first winter since childhood in which skiing is not a major agenda item.

Personality
Poby for SNOW Magazine
Winter Wonderland red text title
finding new fast track(s) since retiring from racing
By Shauna Farnell
Poby for SNOW Magazine
L

indsey Vonn has kept herself plenty busy since retiring from ski racing. The 35-year-old has launched new clothing collections, a beauty line, written a memoir, starred in an HBO documentary, led children’s camps and has walked countless red carpets. Oh yes, she’s also engaged.

Having put her Vail home on the market and relocated to New Jersey with fiancé and NHL star P.K. Subban, Vonn is still coming to terms with the reality of ending her ski career. After all, this marks her first winter since childhood in which skiing is not a major agenda item.

Adventure
Welcome to
Ski(n) Season
The beginner’s guide to skinning
By Micah Ling
COVID-19 UPDATE
Going Up!
The earn-your-turns culture is growing in Colorado, and this season more resorts than ever are offering various deals to those who want to skip the lift line and power up the hill on their own energy.

For the early birds, many resorts offer pre-dawn skinning access, and what’s better than sunrise from the top of a mountain? Some also offer specific routes or have designated guidelines about how to gain uphill access all day long. Always check out websites and talk to guest services before you head up the mountain, so that you have the safest and most updated information. 

personality
D-FENSE!
One-on-One with Denver Broncos Defensive Lineman Shelby Harris
personality
D-FENSE!
One-on-One with Denver Broncos Defensive Lineman Shelby Harris
Shelby Harris
Denver Broncos
Football Life
CT: Tell us a little bit about how the season has shaped up with Coach Vic Fangio.

Harris: There are a lot of new and different things he’s implementing, but they’ve all proved to be really beneficial so far. He’s definitely seasoned in the league, so it’s great to have a coach with this much experience. I mean, he’s coached pro-bowlers, HOF players … many of the best players in the league. It’s really great to learn from him every day. Personally, it’s an especially great year for us to get him as a coach, with it being a contract year for me because he’s known to really help the defense, so I’m just excited to be learning from him and growing as a player before my contract is up.

parting
SHOT
Go Dog Go
Why not have a canine adventure this winter with some four-legged friends? Dogsledding is a fun way to see the beautiful terrain — all while being pulled by friendly fidos who love to race the snow. Go to coloradotravelermagazine.com to check out where to book your dogsledding experience!
Thanks for reading our Winter 2020 issue!