Current
MOUNTAIN
HOME
AESTHETICS
Get a Modern Makeover
By Amanda Molitor
Pictured: 140 West Serapio Drive Telluride, CO.
Current
Pictured: 140 West Serapio Drive Telluride, CO.
MOUNTAIN
HOME
AESTHETICS
Get a Modern Makeover
By Amanda Molitor
T

here’s something about the mountains that captivates us as humans. Their size, the environment they create, the way their colors change throughout the day and throughout the seasons. Mountains have been muses for artists for centuries and continue to inspire the way many choose to decorate their homes.

Bringing the outside into interior design has long been practiced in the mountain regions but recently the typical regional style has seen a shift in approach. Traditionally, mountain motifs have been more literal translations of what it means to live in the Rockies. Interior designs often incorporated the exact hues, textures, and patterns found right outside the front door. Rich, warm-toned paint colors commonly coated the walls of great rooms and bright fabrics often overpowered furniture and window dressings. Similarly, the rustic aesthetic was taken to an extreme in many cases with the over-use of mounted trophy animals, antlers, and historically inspired art. However, today more mountain homes are taking a lighter, less-is-more approach to design.

Over the last decade, the mountain aesthetic has transitioned to a more modern interpretation. The use of neutral color palettes complements the natural beauty of the mountains rather than mimicking them. More grays and taupe colors have made their way into these stunning residences, allowing the views of the ranges themselves to act as the focus of the homes. These revised color choices add a new level of sophistication not previously seen in this kind of home. Color plays a bigger role than one might think in the overall feel of a design. Often times, cooler colors can provide a more relaxing, calming eff ect, which is ideal as many mountain homes are used as secondary or vacation homes.

Some signature design elements that have been cherished as staple styles, such as plaid patterns, are still integrated into rooms but with a more modern, subdued twist. These classic rustic pieces are used as accent pieces instead of focal points within mountain houses. Cleaner lines have replaced much of the heavy, carved furniture more commonly associated with homes in a ski resort or mountain regions. Bringing smaller-scale furnishings into a room creates a more timeless feel that will keep a home on-trend for longer. Not to say that a statement piece, such as a wood slab table, can’t be incorporated. Even the iconic antler chandelier has gotten a modern upgrade and is being used to marry the old with the new in many mountain homes.

In this new era of modern mountain home design, homeowners and interior designers are acknowledging classic rustic components while embracing cleaner, contemporary trends. The blending of these two aesthetics is something that will breathe new life into these homes and elevate the already desirable lifestyle associated with mountain living.

All properties shown are listed for sale by LIV Sotheby’s International Realty. To view our current listings, including an extensive portfolio of stunning resort homes, or to list your home for sale, visit livsothebysrealty.com or call 303.893.3200.

#thelifeyoulove

Pictured: 926 Belleview Avenue Crested Butte, CO.
Pictured: 1800 Beard Creek Trail Edwards, CO.
Pictured: 33 Iron Mask Road Breckenridge, CO.
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